Tag Archives: laughteryogawithjoe

What’s joy got to do with it?

Just over 11 months ago I started interviewing people about joy.

I ask 2 basic questions:

  • what is joy to you? What does it mean to you?
  • How important is it to you?

On facebook (@laughteryogawithjoe) these have been viewed 48,027 times.

They are also on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/user/joehoare27.

I have asked many people from the laughter yoga community and many other wellbeing and spiritual pioneers including:

‘Extreme Pilgim’ Peter Owen Jones https://youtu.be/u_-5jnTYBFY

‘Peace Pilgrim’ Satish Kumar https://youtu.be/TNiMPnFRhbY

‘Spiritual Whisperer’ William Bloom https://youtu.be/tGUoYEOxTX4

‘Kindness’ author Dr David Hamilton PhD https://youtu.be/j4yMbokLiL4

‘Laughter Yoga Guru’ Dr Madan Kataria https://youtu.be/IpA2MxVvkx4

One answer in common is joy is an inside job.

I hope their experiences inspire you to look inside.

www.joehoare.co.uk

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Why make laughter yoga joyous?

Here is a case for making laughter yoga joyous.

As we probably all know and remember, the benefits of laughter come from the act of laughter itself.

However, according to the 2013 report from the European Pain Federation Congress, increased pain tolerance is experienced through ‘real’ (Duchenne) delight when the laughter ‘comes from the heart’ (the link is ‘additional resources’ below).

The Norman Cousins ‘Anatomy of an Illness’ experience is based on the genuine hearty laughter he practised and experienced during his recovery.

In my own experience people get more out of their laughter yoga when it is authentic and heart-felt because this makes their laughter real and funny.

In my own life I find my laughter yoga effective because at some point it becomes joyous and genuinely funny. (Nowadays and as a result of practice I find ‘at some point’ can be instant.)

My approach (MBS – Move, Breathe, Smile) is based on feeling the experience. This sounds simple but like all simple practices (for example, sitting and breathing) it has depth and when we explore deeply we find our edges. This is inherently challenging and uncomfortable and is why we shy away from our inner awareness.

However, ‘the cave you fear to enter holds the treasure that you seek’ (Joseph Campbell).

When we become aware of inner stirrings, the messages from our inner being, we have choices. We can either ignore them or listen to them or listen to them and take action. When we decide to take action we need resources and if we are smart, we use all the resources available to us. We might increase them and practise using them until we reach the point when we are ready to enter the cave and find the treasure.

For some of us the treasure in the cave is joy.

When we find it, the alchemy starts. Our life becomes richer, deeper and fuller. We become more skilled at transforming experiences into joy. As it transforms us it affects those around us.

The transformation will include our work. It becomes more joyous. For we laughter practitioners, our teaching becomes lighter, more heartfelt and authentic. As it does so, the benefits people take away will increase and be more practical and useful.

Are these good reasons for more joy in your life?

Additional resources:

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The most important role of laughter yoga?

An essential part of laughter yoga is sharing joy and kindness. This might be its most important aspect?

Joy – the inner spirit of laughter

I love laughter yoga exercises and use them every day for my own physical, emotional, psychological and spiritual health. I have been using these intentional activities for 3 decades and they now combine in my own personal blend (‘laughterjoega’? ‘laughterjoyga’?). They are an integral part of my life because they work.

However, my own laughter yoga uses fewer and fewer exercises.

In my current life I am doing a lot of voluntary work and meeting people in varying degrees of distress. This is where I use my laughter yoga most. We always have a warm chuckle, even in the direst circumstances. This is intentional on my part. I don’t set out to make them laugh but I do set out to find a moment of joy with them and this always results in a good-natured chuckle.
In fact, I find less is more. The less I ‘do’ and the more I allow, the more easily we connect and find our moment of joy.

Sharing joy is at the heart of laughter yoga. Sharing joy invisibly is the inner spirit of laughter .

We develop this when we stop focusing on laughter yoga exercises and start feeling the energy inside them. Physical laughter yoga exercises whether movement, breath or laughter-based become a platform and a path into the inner spirit of laughter. The benefits include more impact, greater spontaneity and the ability to radiate laughter yoga effortlessly and invisibly. We can do this anytime and anywhere.

Do you?
I’d love to hear your experiences? Please share them?

www.joehoare.co.uk

www.bristollaughterclub.com

(If you want to develop this yourself, you might be interested in this pioneering workshop, ‘The Inner Spirit of Laughter’.)

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