Tag Archives: emotional intelligence

Living passionately in ‘interesting times’ – how does laughter yoga help?

Do you remember the old Chinese curse: ‘may you live in interesting times’?
These times are with us now, so how can laughter yoga help?

I find three qualities are proving especially helpful – live passionately, take ourselves less seriously, and be more spontaneous & flexible 

  1. Live passionately.
    Laughter yoga uses laughter as a practice. It uses is as a yoga, to reconnect and harmonise.
    It energises.
    We breathe better. We oxygenate our blood. We improve our circulation. The net result is we feel energised. When we feel energised, we start to feel passionate.
    Whether done as alone or with others, it works.

[bctt tweet=”‘Passion is energy. Feel the power that comes from focusing on what excites you’. Oprah.” username=”@joehoare”]

Passion sustains us when we encounter difficulties. It is empowering. It builds our resilience and helps us keep going when problems arise, as they always do. A regular and daily laughter practice actively boosts our ability to live passionately.

Keep doing this and you will become energised, you will experience how your passion follows your energy, and consequently you feel in better control of our life – even in ‘interesting’ times.

A basic practice is: breathe in, pause, smile, and in a good-natured way, chuckle as you breathe out – pause, feel.
Repeat.

[bctt tweet=”A basic practice is: breathe in, pause, smile, and in a good-natured way chuckle as you breathe out – pause, feel. Repeat. #laughteryogawithJoe” username=”@joehoare”]

  1. Take ourselves less seriously
    While it essential to take what we do seriously, especially nowadays, it is equally important not to take ourselves too seriously. When we take ourselves too seriously, our ‘message’ becomes ‘heavy’ rather than ‘light, and so we undermine it. This is particularly jarring in laughter yoga where the aim is to promote joyfulness, connection and open-heartedness (among other qualities).
    To start taking ourselves less seriously, practice laughing at yourself.
    A basic practice here is to look in a mirror, remind ourselves of all our foibles, point at ourselves, and have a good-natured chuckle. Learning to laugh at ourselves is liberating for others as well as ourselves.

  1. Let go & be more flexible.
    When the facts change, I change my mind. What do you do, sir?” John Maynard Keynes.

Changing our mind can be a tricky skill to master, yet it is essential if we want to be resilient, deal with stress well, and adapt properly as life changes around us. One easy way is regularly to ask ourselves ‘What if?’
It is a useful exercise to imagine circumstances being different, reversed, in a different order – just to see what insights occur to us, and therefore how we might do things differently.

[bctt tweet=”‘Learning is not compulsory. Neither is survival’ W. Edwards Deming” username=”@joehoare “]

When we feel energised and passionate, it is easier to start imagining the previously unimaginable without feeling too threatened. When we approach this reviewing process as a game and engage with it playfully, it becomes easier to be open-minded and consider new ideas and possibilities.

A quick and easy way to become more playful is to move around playfully. We become energised when we spend a few moments being physically active, and combining this with playfulness moves us quickly into an open-minded and creative space. If you’re not sure how to, think of Monty Python’s Ministry of Silly Walks?

The value of this flexibility, in combination with passion and playfulness, is it helps us adapt more easily as life changes, which is why laughter yoga is an effective tool for contemporary living – just keep practicing.

Useful links

www.joehoare.co.uk

Smiling is good for the heart

Laughter and mood change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Laughter yoga tips for effortless laughter

Effortless laughter.

It’s a vibe thing.
When you yourself feel it, you transmit it, effortlessly.
The knack is to feel it, genuinely & authentically, in your core.

‘It’, of course, is good-natured warmth. ‘It’ is also joyfulness.

It is also acceptance, the acceptance of our inner dark and light, of our sorrows as well as our joys. It is the ability to cry as well as laugh.

‘It’ takes practice. The practice is endless, but it gets better. Life becomes more joyful.
Is this a good reason to practice?

Laughter yoga is wonderful for this. There is a great practice, of laughing at oneself. The practice of being able to laugh through, at & with our ‘story’ is very profound. It is liberating because it puts us increasingly at ease with life and all it brings – the downs as well as the ups.
You practice laughing no matter what you’re feeling.
It is the equivalent of keeping breathing, no matter what you’re feeling. Just keep breathing.
After all, isn’t a laugh just a type of out-breath?

When we have learnt to laugh like this, people sense it. It allows them to laugh more easily, effortlessly even. This inner freedom, the freedom referred to by Marianne Williamson in her memorable Our deepest fear‘ quote, gives others permission to feel more expansively too. When this is done in a space that allows and encourages good-natured  connection, whether in a laughter yoga/wellness session or in fact any other session, effortless natural spontaneous laughter often occurs.
It usually occurs.
In fact, it almost invariably occurs.

If you run any kind of ‘laughter’ sessions, this is a very good skill to learn.

As a personal practice, it is extremely liberating.
It is another one of these ‘simple but not easy’ practices, and like all such practices, it is potentially life-changing in a good way.

The underlying reason for this effortless laughter involves being present and experiencing the joy that simply being alive can offer. When we are able to relax into the ‘now’, it is usually a joyful experience, and in this state, good-natured laughter easily and naturally bubbles up.
This applies as much as a personal practice as a group skill.

Are these good reasons to learn it?

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Useful links include:

group laughter skills (webinar)

group laughter skills (course)

personal practice (book)

general information

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Laughter wellness: what is it and why does it work?

 

At last.

‘Now we are 8’, 8 years into the Great Recession, one ever-pressing question is: what works? The harder the times, the more pressing this question.

Three of the threads proving their effectiveness are:

  • Mindfulness: present-moment awareness, encouraging emotionally intelligent and self-responsible behaviour
  • Positive Psychology: the impact of positivity on emotions, happiness and effectiveness
  • Wellness: overturns stress, anxiety & depression, and promotes connection and resilience.

In the ‘Wellness’ picture, the role of ‘laughter wellness’ has its place because it is upbeat & energising, simple & effective, and fast.

It combines wellness activities with enjoyment. The result is calmness, connection and resilience which manifests in happier productivity.

BNP (Banque National de Paris), among others, used ‘zest for life’ recently.
We moved around the space, walked at different tempos, internalised & isolated ourselves, communicated & connected with each other, and kept expanding our awareness – all in a framework of good-natured exploration.

Apprehensive, heady, pressured individuals turned up and surprised, relaxed, energised & connected individuals left.

The surprise was because of how little we did and how well it worked. We moved, we breathed, we kept expanding our connection. We all felt well, no matter how we were feeling at the start of the session.

The moral? Laughter yoga in the form of ‘Laughter wellness’ has the magic combination of simplicity, enjoyment and effectiveness.

It works.

Time to take laughter wellness seriously?

Laughter yoga, laughter wellness and ‘zest for life’

Huff Post laughter yoga

10 minute session video

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Finding your place in the laughter yoga world

 

You’ve got the enthusiasm. You’ve done the training. What next?

Sometimes what follows is a scenario where you run one or three sessions and then you don’t quite know how to develop these further. Sometimes people come to a session, love it, and in spite of raving about it, they never return.
Sometimes they might not quite ‘get’ what it’s about. Sometimes they might think it’s ‘just’ a bit of fun but not really important, not comparable with ‘serious’ practices like….well, yoga?

This can be discouraging.

In my 14 years in the laughter yoga world, this is a scenario I’ve encountered many times. I also wrestled with it myself in the Bristol laughter workshops (www.bristollaughterclub.com) where on one occasion in the 13 years it’s been running, only 1 person turned up. After the initial scariness (on my part, I should add), we proceeded to have a very valuable hour and a half.
It was excellent coaching practice.

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Nowadays these sessions average over 20 participants, with lots of them coming back. The sessions always attract further interest and professional inquiries, from charity to blue chip. This is partly because there is a greater general awareness of and appreciation for all wellness and yoga practices, but also because I’ve developed my own style and built my own niche to maximise the value people get.
They ‘get’ the value.

I’ve also been in lots of other people’s sessions and have experienced successful styles that are completely different to my own. I’ve observed and felt that style itself simply doesn’t matter. What matters is that it’s YOUR style. As you develop your own style, you will find your niche.

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In my experience, more often than not, this niche combines with other modalities & practices which is why you need to have the courage to be flexible, spontaneous and adaptable.

The laughter yoga world is expanding fast now because the whole wellness world is expanding fast. World-wide there is greater interest in being healthy & happy, and personal development practices are something that more and more people are prepared to devote time, energy and resources to.

It has become clear to me that we all have a niche. It is sometimes/often/usually not what we expect, but we all have one. Finding your niche and building your presence & impact, and hence rewards, is the subject of this webinar.

Time, science and general interest are all on our side. There are excellent resources on Facebook, twitter and Linkedin. I post articles regularly in the ‘about’ section on my own website.

We are moving with the tide of history. At the very least, do keep practicing?

Exclusive webinar, limited places: build your niche, presence, impact and rewards, 13th March, 6pm UK time

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Laughter, happiness: what’s pain got to do with it?

All the best & juiciest bits of life are in our shadow, that painful place where we don’t like to look, that place we try and rationalise away. We cleverly or clumsily pretend it isn’t there, or worse, pretend we don’t need to go there – into the lurking cave where our ‘monster’ lives.

What we forget is that inside this same cave is our treasure, our life’s juiciness. It is just the other side of our fearsome ‘monster’. But we’re afraid the ‘monster’ will devour us, destroy us, annihilate us.
What we also forget is that our ‘monster’ wants to play, to dance. A love dance. A happy dance. A playful dance. A dance of delight.
Our ‘monster’ wants us to set it free.

I have seen people transformed by taking their ‘monster’ into their arms and play with it.

I’ve seen their body change. I’ve felt their breathing change. I’ve heard their voice change.
I’ve seen them transform – relax and become happier.
I’ve heard their laugh change.

All of us in the field of developing human potential – mindfulness, meditation, laughter yoga, laughter therapy, positive psychology, emotional intelligence et al – need to have danced with our ‘monster’, our pain.
How else can we invite others to develop, if we haven’t?

Build your courage.
Smile. Laugh. Breathe deeply. Laugh. Loosen your body. Laugh. Mentally say ‘YES’.
Trust – hold your hand out in invitation, take your ‘monster’ and dance & play.

Do it. Do it now. Whatever it takes, however you do it – just do it now. Dance & play with laughter and delight. Lead and follow. Swirl, twirl, roll & rock, leap, sway and smile.

Do it now.

www.joehoare.co.uk

‘Awakening the Laughing Buddha within’

Monthly laughletter

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